Bare Meetings

Below is a section of a Charles Spurgeon sermon from 1856 (he was only 22 years old)!!

The sermon is based on a text in Habakkuk 3:2 “O Lord, revive your work.”

I am putting on this blog because it sounds a little…..familiar don’t you think?

Once you’re done with laughing out loud, you may weep in silence……

Charles Spurgeon said,

“Look at our prayer meetings, with only an exception here and there, there are, possibly, six old women present;  scarcely ever do enough male members come to pray even four times a year.

chspurgeon_youngerPrayer meetings they are called; they ought to be called “bare meetings”, for they are barely attended…….

…. Let me ask you, instead of grumbling at your minister, instead of finding fault with the different parts of the Church, let me ask you to cry out, “O Lord, revive your work.”

“Oh!” one says, “Oh, that we had another minister!  Oh, that we had another kind of worhip!  Oh, that we had a different sort of preaching!”

Just as if that were the simple solution; but my prayer is, “Oh, that the Lord would come into the hearts of the men you have!  Oh, that he would make the forms you use to be full of power!”

You don’t need fresh ways or new structures; you need life in those that you have.

There is a locomotive on the railroad tracks; but the train will not move.  “Bring another locomotive,” one says, “and another, and another.”  The locomotives are brought, but the train still does not move.  Light the fire and get up more steam, that is what you need; not new engines.

We do not need new ministers, or new plans, or new ways, though many might be invented, to make the Church better; we only need life and fire in those we have.

with the very man who has emptied your Church, the very same person that weakened your prayer meetings, God can yet make the Church to be crowded to the doors, and give thousands of souls to that very man.

It is not a new man that is needed; it is the life of God in him.  Don’t be crying for something new; it will no more solve your problem than what you now have.

Cry out, “O Lord, revive your work.”

And he said all this and more in

1856Not much change there then!

Press on, brothers and sisters, and preach the Gospel as the singular urgent priority.

Anonymous

Anonymous-Rain-l

Walter Lüthi said this about the cowardly nature of anonymity:

‘God has a name. The misery on this earth is nameless, the evil among men is nameless, for the powers of darkness love to be without a name. Nameless, anonymous letters, letters without signatures are usually vulgar. But God is no writer of anonymous letters; God puts His name to everything that He does, effects, and says; God has no need to fear the light of day.

The Devil loves anonymity, but God has a name. He did not get this name by chance; in fact He did not receive it at all: He gave it to Himself because He wants to have a name. For him, name does not mean noise and smoke that cloud the splendour of Heaven;

His name is His sign, the sign that shows that He is the true God; His name is His signature, so to speak, His monogram, His seal, His stamp (His trademark, if you will!) – whatever bears His stamp is God’s. God would certainly have had the power to be nameless; but because He loves clarity and hates obscurity He preferred not to be a nameless God’.

 

I hope this does not appear to contradict the reason for my own blogging anonymity.  I for one see mine as a way to write freely and honestly, even though there are a few who know who I am (I shall not be precious about it).  This post is aimed at the cowards who hide behind a self-righteous critique of others probably because they could not sustain their argument beyond the first round of responses.  To them this post is (sarcastically) dedicated.  Charles Spurgeon was once handed a note as he ascended the pulpit.  On it, was simply written “Fool.”  To which Charles responded by beginning his sermon, “Normally I get letters without names.  Today, I have received a letter with only the name:  Fool.